Tag Archive: life


Love

Victor Frankenstein is a very intelligent human being who is derived by his obsession to create life through science. He and his beautiful wife, Elizabeth, live together in a nice home not so far out of town. They live a very happy life as a marriage and both attend prestigious colleges near the area. In the same way, both of them are financially stable and come from very wealthy families. However, months into their marriage, Victor finds out one of Elizabeth’s darkest secrets. That is, Elizabeth cannot have children of her own due to serious health purposes.They exhaustingly start to use all their resources to remediate this issue, but was of no help. No amount of money was able to solve their problem. Be that as it may, having children has always been one of Victor’s biggest dreams. For years, he wished of having a perfect family of his own given that he was denied that opportunity by his selfish parents. He grew up without a mother and a dad who was never really around. So, he thought of solutions non stop until one day, his interest in science and his obsession to have kids with elizabeth came in to relation.

As a result, Victor Frankenstein begins working on a science experiment to create life in a lab. He becomes dedicated to the idea of birthing a child of whom he and his wife can raise together as a happy family. For this reason he lasts months working on this experiment behind his wife’s back. In like manner, after 1 year of hard work and dedication Victor Frankenstein brought to life his experiment. At first, Victor noticed how disfigure and different  the creature looked given that he was build from different beings body parts. He was afraid his wife would reject the creature as their children due to his abnormal physical looks. But, Victor took a different approach when the first thing the creature did was grab his finger and call him “Dad”. From that point on, Victor grew a connection with his creation and learned to love him in every possible way. Similarly, Elizabeth took the same approach upon meeting the creature and took huge interest in teaching him all he needed to know to survive. Victor Frankenstein could not be any happier.

Correspondingly, Victor and Elizabeth raised the creation by educating and loving it as their own. In the same way, Society viewed the creature as a different abled being, but accepted and respected it like any other person. The creation was referred to as Frankenstein and lived a normal life.  He wandered around the world experiencing life and living day to day. He caused no harm to anyone instead he was always showing affection to those around him. He was immensely grateful to his creator and Elizabeth for always surrounding him with love and affection because that was all he knew. He had the purest heart anyone could ever come across. His heart did not know the word hate. Love was the only thing he received, experienced, knew, and felt in one.

 

Review:

I titled this short piece, Love. It is a Frankenstein myth based of Mary Shelley’s novel that only introduces love, passion, and acceptance all throughout. In the real novel, Mary Shelley tends to relate the creation to continuous negativity such as death, hate, and violence from the moment it is brought to life all the way to the end of the novel. One major twist to my story and Mary Shelley’s novel is the relationship between the creation and his creator. In my story, not only is the creature accepted by his creator but is also introduced to elizabeth and society. He is born into a loving, accepting and welcoming home unlike Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein from 1832 where all he knows of is rejection. I make a different approach because I want my audience to acknowledge how different the creature reacts upon receiving hate versus receiving love. When one gives love, they receive love back but when one gives hate then hate will be the only thing given back. Victor Frankenstein is blind for not seeing what his creature needs.

In like manner, I decided to incorporate Elizabeth in the story, and change her story up into a more positive one too. In the novel Frankenstein, women don’t play a big role in society and are portrayed as weak, and innocent. Meanwhile, In Love, I introduce her as a student and loving wife. Most of Victor’s actions are influenced by his love to Elizabeth and the idea of having a family with her. Victor, too, is more affectionate and caring in terms of his relationship with Elizabeth, and his creation.

In essence, my biggest objective in this creative writing was turning a sad story full of hatred into a loving and learning one. All throughout Mary Shelley’s novel, the creature experienced rejection from everyone and as a result killed many innocent people. I figured that allowing the creature to receive love instead of hate would cause a different reaction in the creature. And Indeed, in my story there was a happy ending.

 

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Christopher Martinez

Narrative:

Once, there was an ambitious scientist whose name was Darwin Frankenstein. Darwin was a very ambitious person and always sought to explore the unknown. His intentions as a scientist was to find out the truth of everything that had a life. In other words, he wanted to recreate life itself. Some would say Darwin Frankenstein is the modern Prometheus, while others may call him idiotic for trying to challenge the creator of his existence – god.  Darwin attended a very prestigious university that focused on the sciences, however, Darwin also learned about the philosophical thoughts created about humans itself. Darwin would hate any other class that had nothing to do with his passion. Using his brilliant mindset, he wanted to create a ‘thing’ with life and emotion. Darwin wanted a companion with consciousness.

When Darwin graduated from his university he had a goal that had to be fulfilled before the day of his death. Darwin wanted the power of life in his hand. One stormy night while walking back home from a small distraction break, Darwin saw something crying its soul out through the corner of his eye. Darwin saw the shadow of death take away the soul of a tender young black dog. As soon as Darwin saw this, he grabbed the dog and rushed straight to his house. Darwin ran with excitement, his dopamine levels were out of control. It was as if Darwin entered a state of euphoria as he finally knew what he was going to experiment on. When Darwin got home he placed the dog on his table and began the procedure. He took out the dogs brain and replaced it with a humans brain that he stole from a nearby hospital. He shaved the dog’s hair and switched it to something very odd. Darwin then stitched up the young dog as he was getting mentally ready for the moment. As the lighting reflected Darwin’s face, he flipped the electric switch that would change the meaning of life. “IT ALIVE!” said Darwin.

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Darwin looked at the dog with happiness all written all over him. “ Those blue eyes, the white fur, the perfect paws. What a beautiful dog.” Darwin looked at the dog as something to praise. He felt the power of the highest power on his hands. The dog began to run around like a lost person in the wilderness, but once the dog stopped he looked at Darwin and growled. Darwin ran away into his other room, however, when he came back to take a peek into his home laboratory, the dog disappeared.

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Darwin had looked everywhere and the fear spread through his veins. Darwin was starting to go insane. He didn’t even take a glance to reflect what he had done. If only he knew that the dog died from abuse and the dogs wish was to go into his paradise. The dog was rather happy dying. On the other hand, the human brain that Darwin had captured was a brain that would’ve saved a human’s life. The person who needed the brain had been waiting for years and years. If only Darwin took the time to realize what he was doing.

 

Review:

Dear Christopher Martinez,

I want to start off by saying that I really enjoyed your replication of Frankenstein and adapting it to the 21st century. I think that the story really showed Darwin real side in the original Frankenstein. Everything felt right and the sense of originality and creativity is shown. Throughout the story, Darwin is shown as a person who is very ambitious and wants to make something that has never been made before. He wants to have the hands of god and use it to his own benefit. Throughout this short replication of Frankenstein, Darwin is shown as a person who is fully dedicated to his mission. He goes to college for his own benefit and doesn’t really care about anything else that he learns. He ignores the real world just to have the same power as a creator! I also see a connection between the definition of beauty in the original Frankenstein and your story. Frankenstein’s ideology in beauty is that the European looks (white, blue eyes, and clear skin) are better looking than others. The use of the dog’s fur shows how Darwin wants only “beautiful and perfect” looks for his creation

Originality is shown in the story in a very unique way. The way the story is formatted gave me the chills. For example, you used similes to give any reader an image of what they are exactly reading. In your version of the story, I learned about Darwin obtaining a dog and getting a human’s brain. I read a bit of context on these two subjects, however, at the end of your story you come back to these and explain the meaning of these two important parts of the story. I found out how the dog actually died and what the brain was being used for. I am interpreting that you wanted readers to feel like Darwin. Darwin is shown a person who doesn’t give much thought to his actions and likewise, I felt that way as well. I read about these two things with little to no context and I didn’t pause to think what these two objects in the story truly signified about Darwin’s personality.

From,

A Bobcat

 

Devastating Ignorance

Sabrina Vazquez

Since lecture on Wednesday and considering the devastating fire that has taken so many lives in northern California, my thoughts have not been far from the effects of global warming. Siobhan Carroll’s statement “In works such as Frankenstein we can nevertheless see an uncanny reflection of our own struggles to discern the nature of, and decide on the proper response to, alterations in the global climate.” (524). There is virtually no time between one natural disaster to the next happening in the world, that are all the consequence of global warming, it is undeniable, but yet it is denied. Time and time again, from people who personify the saying ‘ignorance is bliss’, climate change is called a ‘hoax, or a ‘secret to agenda to push’. Carroll in relation to the novel declares that we must accept our fault in the situation or else it will be too late, much like Frankenstein and his creation. In order to repair even a fraction of the damage caused to Earth ignorance can no longer be tolerated. The fire that has demolished Paradise is a call to deniers to pull their heads from the sand, Global warming is undeniable and it’s devastating us all.

Be Open

 

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Christopher Martinez

In the book Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, there are multiple parts that show the injustices of being different. Jessica states with passion and dignity in her blog post that there should be a, “reclaim the word tranny. For me, it is time to dull the impact these words have when used against us. It is well worth embracing who we are as monsters.” When she says that the word tranny should be changed and interpreted a different way it reminds me of Frankenstein’s experience as a lonely monster – maybe even part of the LGBTQ community like Jessica.

There is multiple parts in the book where the monster shows the willingness to try to be like everyone else, yet also having the idea of self-hate. An example of this can be found in chapter 15 when the monster begins to be eager to learn more about the world he is in and what he is in society. He reads books and discovers many different feelings. He states, “I can hardly describe to you the effect of these books. They produced in me an infinity of new images and feelings, that sometimes raised me to ecstasy, but more frequently sunk me into the lowest djection.” (115) Just like in Jessica’s post there is several mentions of wanting to be themselves, but society doesn’t allow them to. In addition, there is a connection between the monsters hate for the world he lives in and the world a queer or a lesbian lives in. When Stryker mentioned, “On January 5, 1993, a 22-year-old pre-operative transsexual woman from Seattle, Filisa Vistima, wrote in her journal, “I wish I was anatomically ‘normal’ so I could go swimming. . . . But no, I’m a mutant, Frankenstein’s monster,” this made me think of the ideas the monster had himself. The monster said, “Cursed, cursed, cursed! Why did I live? Why, in that instant, did I not extinguish the spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed?” (121) This gives evidence that the monster Victor created is no different from people who are homosexual or bisexual. They feel different like the monster in Frankenstein. Now I am not calling anyone a monster, but in fact, I am blaming the community for not allowing beautiful and unique ‘monsters’ into society. Just like Jessica said in her blog, “I can want to kill them with kindness, but their vitriol and hatred might wear down on me faster.” As humans, we aren’t seeing the right picture when interpreting someone. We saw the monster as a man, but is he really? Is the monster wanting to be himself, but the monster is furious about the close mindsets humans have.

Victor against Anne Mellor’s beliefs

In Anne Mellor’s essay, A Feminist Critique of Science, it is demonstrated how dealing with the use of science in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein unraveled an important perspective into the manner that nature is viewed with a feminine perspective. Mellor makes it clear that nature should not be manipulated or controlled in science. She believes respecting it and constantly accounting for it when conducting certain experiments. As for in the novel, Mellor’s argument and rules can be seen being completely put aside and forgotten about. Victors arrogance and egotistic mindset ultimately revealed his repression towards the opposite sex by his aspiration to manipulate and control all nature and create life.

In Frankenstein, Victor repeatedly references nature and when he does this he depicts nature as a woman. This can be seen on page 46 of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein when Victor says “…but her immoral lineaments were still a wonder and a mystery.” This demonstrates that Victor does call nature a woman, however, he does not do it with the intention to harm or hinder her rather allowing him to interpret nature better. On page 46 as well, Victor states “…here were men who had penetrated deeper and knew more.” When Victor speaks about science he is stating that these scientists “penetrated” deeper into the understanding of manipulating nature thus allowing them to control and continue to learn from it. Victors enthusiasm to apply feminity to nature and to so discover secrets about it shows this strong sense of oppression towards it.

To conclude, we can see Mellor’s arguments continue to get certified when Victor views a lightning strike, and he describes it as something “…[curious] and [delightful]”. Victor describes this sequence as a sort of mystery, however, it can be interpreted as if it is a warning from mother nature or foreshadowing what is to come for Victor if he continues to question and attempt to unravel the depths of mother nature. Ultimately, despite this “warning”, Victor is left with sorrow and nothing due to his fascination with wanting to distort and manage “mother nature” for his own self-centered objectives.

By: Daniel Olmos

Maricruz Rivas

By analyzing Frankenstein and Anne Mellor’s essay it becomes obvious that there is much more to Victor’s desire of creating a creature than mere curiosity. Victor Frankenstein seems to be unfulfilled and he is looking for something to fill the empty space within him. In science he finds room to develop creations to fill those empty spaces…it’s a wonder that his first creation is life, a child to subdue his loneliness. By choosing to create a life Victor defies nature (often associated with femininity) and the idea of “natural order”…he uses science to bring life into the world for his own perverted benefit. Anne Mellor states in her article, “A Feminist Critique of Science,” that Mary Shelley intentionally made Victor the direct opposite of an emotionally aware person which by default means he was by no means prepared to be sensitive to the long term needs of his creation. I believe that in a semi-unintentional way the creature was created to suffer along side Victor – a partner in misery because Victor was in desperate need of a connection even if it was unnatural and miserable for all involved. We see that after the death of his mother (and maybe before though there isn’t a lot of textual evidence to go off of) Victor struggles with creating connections with people even those he cares about most like Elizabeth and his father rather, he develops a deep connection to his work. He consumes his life with studying and learning but not on cultivating emotional bonds with people. 

I believe that Victor Frankenstein puts his disregard for the process of “natural science” best when referring to the beginning of his interest in science and his disinterest of natural history, “…I at once gave up my former occupations; set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation; and entertained the greatest disdain for a would be science, which could never even step within the threshold of real knowledge,” (48) in that passage there is purposeful language used by Shelly to depict the eventual creation of something “deformed”. In my opinion, Victor doesn’t actually have any regard for science and moreover he is unable to see outside of his lonely existence long enough to see that an unnatural creation is a bad idea! Sadly, his desire to give life is directly associated to his desire for connection – he is desperate for a bond and who better to know what he needs than himself. In Victor’s eyes there is no greater giver of life than him which directly goes against natural order because as biology would have it it is not within his ability to do so. 

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Christopher Martinez
Throughout Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, there is a sense of Victor’s affection for life made by women. Based on Anne Mellor’s conclusion that, “the scientist who analyses, manipulates, and attempts to control nature unconsciously engages in a form of the oppressive sexual politics,” I can interpret that Victor Frankenstein is in need for the desire of a woman’s womb. This can be clearly be shown when Victor Frankenstein is practicing science with his professor. He wants the power to control nature – It is his fate. We see examples of this when he says “Natural philosophy is the genius that has regulated my fate; I desire, therefore, in this narration, to those fact which led to my predilection for that science.” (45) This view that Victor has is a curse that keeps on haunting him. He won’t let go until he is completely satisfied. Unfortunately, that never happens to Victor.

 

Also, we see Victors encounter with science when M. Waldman gives Victor a set of things to do to possess powerful knowledge. After having some sleep Victor states he, “only remained a resolution to return to the ancient studies, and to devote myself to a science for which I believed myself to possess a natural talent.” (53) This shows the intentions Victor has. There is a connection between Anne Mellor’s statement and this section in the book since Anne Mellor says, “Moreover, in trying to create a human being as God created Adam, out of earth and water, all at once, Victor Frankenstein robs nature of something more than fertilizer.” (7) Victor Frankenstein seems to learn about the sciences in the wrong way. Anne Mellor mentions that he wants that power. Additionally, this can relate back to the discussion about psychoanalysis. Since we now know Victor wants his dead mother’s affection, there is a conclusion that Victor is committed to getting that power to life to pursue happiness. Victor Frankenstein is a bit greedy with his actions. He is manipulating his sexual desire.

Motherly Obsessions

Esther Quintanilla

In Frankenstein: A Feminist Critique of Science, written by Anne Mellor, a depiction of nature as female is established. With the idea of “Mother Nature” and the stereotype of women being the ones who bring life into this world, this is a known idea. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein completely destroys this stereotype. Victor Frankenstein creates life, that is, artificial life, and expects to control the entity that he created. Mellor states, “the scientist who analyses, manipulates, and attempts to control nature unconsciously engages in a form of oppressive sexual politics” (12). Victor Frankenstein is contributing to the oppressive society that depicts women as sweet, naïve creatures and is expecting to dominate over them. Victor, therefore, is erasing the need for women in the novel, as life can be artificially made. This leaves the notion that Victor had a desire to give birth.

In order to achieve this goal, Victor turns to science. Instantly, Victor revels in the ideas of science and becomes obsessed with giving birth to artificial life. This becomes the focal point of Victor’s existence. The relationships that Victor had with various female figures in his life also may have had an impact on how he was picturing himself creating life.

Victor’s relationships with the women in his life may have had an impact on his desire to give birth. His mother, although Victor may or may not have had a desire to sleep with her, was caring and nurturing toward him. Elizabeth, who replaced Victor’s mother after she passed, was a loved figure who cared deeply for Victor. He may have seen the way that the women around him were nurturing and loving and developed a need to be in a similar situation. However, it turns in the completely opposite direction. Victor abandons his child at birth and forsakes any implication of motherhood in his own being. Without even realizing, Victor slowly begins to turn on motherhood and becomes a figure that destroys life. An example of this is the mere abandonment of his creature. Victor, by abandoning his creation, sets up a destructive fate for it.

A Continuous Reality

Throughout the course of human history, one concept has remained in constant discussion: the perpetual battle between men and women’s rights. The argument of women’s rights and equality continues to be discussed in today’s modern day society. In Molly Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Men, the author explains the importance of gender and social class equality for women and the need for revolution. Wollstonecraft explains “never was any man, much less a woman, rendered amiable by the force of those exalted qualities, justice, wisdom, and truth; thus forewarned of the sacrifice they must make to those unnatural virtues…they would be authorized to turn all their attention to their persons”. This statement explains that women are forced to conform with society’s values instead of creating their own self-images. A woman must comply with what is asked rather than following her own moral beliefs. Wollstonecraft’s ideas on society’s view of women directly correlates with the unfortunate fate of Justine’s death in Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein.

As Justine converses about her unavoidable death, she explains “I do not fear to die…I am resigned to the fate awaiting me. Learn from me, dear lady, to submit in patience to the will of Heaven” (Shelly 83). This passage exemplifies the distorted self-perception of women, and how women are made to justify and accept the cruel “punishments” that await them for their “wrong doings”. Justine’s perspective on her death validate Wollstonecraft’s statements that women become submissive to the distorted ideals that they are exposed to since birth. These ideas allow for Justine to submit to her “fate” of death without any justification of her being the true murderer. As a result, Justine continues the ever-lasting cycle of women submissiveness and is merely a product of the ideals that were passed down from the generations before her.

Written by Cathryn Flores

“A servant in Geneva does not mean the same thing as a servant in France and England. Justine, thus received in our family, learned the duties of a servant, a condition which, in our fortunate country, does not include the idea of ignorance and a sacrifice of the dignity of a human being.” I think Burke would agree with this quote because he saw the revolution in France caused because a lack of knowledge and civility. The importance of her death is, that it promotes the idea the mob rule is negative and that innocent people will die of it. Edmund Burke makes the same argument in “Reflections On The Revolution In France.” Burke thinks it would be best for the people to be prudent and keep their civility rather than running around chopping people’s head off just because of a frenzy. Burke believes that the only way to have freedom is through a system such as a government in which the working class can be happy in, and that by leaving the systems in play there can be a sort of checks and balances. But once you let the people take over in a form of mob rule, innocents will die, just like Justine did. The people grouped up in sort of a mob and accused her of murdering William. The people should have thought about everything reasonably instead of radically. The importance of Justine’s death and long backstory is to show the readers that this is a human being they are putting up for death. An attempt to humanize her to the mob and to the audience, an attempt to say who are we to say who shall live and survive. Burke says the same, except the people had already decided who to kill just as the people in Frankenstein had decided Justine was to be killed as well. Because of mob rule, Burke argues, the people will have freedom in one sense but wont be free from fear or loss or their safety. Which is what has happened in Frankenstein, they have killed an innocent person, if the people are killing innocents, then no one is safe. I still feel that Burke believes the killing of Marie was as senseless as the killing of Justice on Frankenstein.

  • Andres Quezada