Tag Archive: disability


Society are for the “normal”

-David Obeso

Comment number five would be the most accurate representation of the entire 2015 “Frankenstein” film because comment number 5 talks about how Adams inability to speak and lack of perception towards the world is treated as a mistake that must be fixed and therefore carried out by treating Adam like an animal. In the film one of the most important factors that mold Adam as he grows is society. Society treats him like an animal, banishing him from civilization not through direct means but through societies preconceived notions of those the disabled and the homeless. We can see this as his friend the blind man is also marginalized and so are other groups that represent a disability. Marginalized because they are “unlike” the “normal” people of society, because in the eyes of the ignorant the disabled are malfunctioned humans not fit for a normal life.

The Clash of Disability Models

By Isaac Gallegos R.

“Victor and Elizabeth view their creation in different ways. In a way, they serve as stand-ins for how science tends to view people with disabilities. On the one hand, Elizabeth, people with disabilities are still able to feel and should be viewed with compassion. They should be cared for. On the other hand, Victor represents viewing people with disabilities as lesser, as failed by-products, that need to be taken care of.”

I chose the 2nd observation (quoted above) because I think the observation made, regarding the contrasting perspectives of the scientific community and their opinions on disability, can be built upon and investigated. When reading Parker’s chapter on Disability Studies, we learn that the two most prominent models are the “social disability model” and the “personal disability model”. And as the person observed, Victor Frankenstein aligns more with the personal disability model (therefore looking at a single individual and blaming their “alter-ability” for the challenges they face) and Elizabeth being a closer representation of the “social disability model” (and therefore seeing how society helps construct the obstacle rather than just the disability).

This observation can be built upon and observed throughout the whole movie and can be beneficial in Disability Studies, one can even say that the roles of Victor and Elizabeth can be a metaphor on the struggle between the different perspectives on disability (within our society and scientific communities). And with Elizabeth’s murder at the hands of Victor, it can further highlight the dominance of the “personal disability model”, and the prevalence of individuals with disabilities being blamed for the obstacles that they face in our society.  With this, it helps us understand that we need to integrate more inclusive infrastructure and be more open-minded when it comes to disability.

I believe that the top hat response of, “Somehow, by wanting to produce a more perfect human being, Victor and Elizabeth are admitting to disabilities of their own. A creature impervious to pain and is virtually indestructible by medical and other violent means would be a triumph to the Frankensteins- if Adam were more conventionally attractive and had a neuro-typical consciousness.” has the potential for a broader interpretation of the film. The way Victor looked at Adam, was completely different than the way he looks at anyone else throughout the entire film. When Adam first came to life, Victor looked at him with amazement, but once he couldn’t speak and his skin began to change in appearance, then Victor’s look changed to discomfort. Victor was unhappy with Adam becoming so close to his wife, who became a mother figure to him. Perhaps it was due to him being ashamed by the way Adam looked and how he acted, but Victor clearly didn’t want to be a father figure to the “Monster” he has created. Once his disabilities began to present himself, Victor could hardly wait to get rid of Adam. It was too much for him to deal with, the unsuccessfulness of his creation caused a feeling of failure in himself.

– Alina Cantero

A Surface Human

  1.  Since the beginning of his creation, Adam was not seen as an equal to his “parents”, especially Victor. Instead, the monster was seen as submissive and incapable of performing “normal” tasks such as speaking and communicating properly. However, Adam did possess abnormal abilities such as having enormous amounts of strength. Although Adam had the potential to learn and be nurtured by Victor and Elizabeth, the scientists failed to make an effort in raising their creation. Adam’s unique, super-human abilities went unseen due to the scientists’ lack of acknowledgement towards these characteristics, which leads Adam to perform horrific acts on innocent civilians.

I chose this topic because the treatment Adam receives from his creators explains his actions throughout the movie, in which he is unable to control his super-strength abilities in society. Adam’s objectification by Victor is an indicator of why the monster acts the way he does, for is he a product of his environment.

By Cathryn Flores

 

Rilee Hoch

I believe comment number five provides the best opportunity for further interpretation of disability in the film. It reads, “I noticed that the “disability” portrayed in the film is “Adam’s” inability to speak and comprehend his surroundings. This is something that the doctors believed needed to be fixed. In doing so, they treated “Adam” like an animal; the scene in which they inject medicine into his body is very similar to when a veterinarian puts shots into a dog”.

This comment shows the idea that disabilities are simply labels given to us by other people, or society who know nothing of our own existence. Adam is stuck with this label by his “parents” Victor and Elizabeth but he has no say as to whether he would consider his inability to speak a disability or not. This comment also shows how they deemed the “disability” as something that needed to be fixed. This could serve as a commentary for the way society views disabilities, as something needing a solution or an infirmity needing healing. We know of course that this is not the case. It also speaks on how people with these so called “disabilities” are treated by our society. They are deemed outcasts and shown either humiliating amounts of sympathy and compensation like Elizabeth shows Adam, or extreme prejudice and discrimination like Victor shows. The idea that they create a living thing, yet as soon as they uncover a flaw they are wiling to put it down like, “when a veterinarian puts shots into a dog” is profound and speaks volumes about how disability is shown in the film. I think overall this comment has multiple aspects that could very effectively be used as a commentary of disability and disability studies as a whole.

By Alex Luna

I have chosen comment #2 because I feel it represents the themes of the film as a whole. Throughout the movie, we are to believe that Elizabeth has more empathy for Adam than Victor does, and this is evident through her role as the mother. The comment mentions how they each view Adam in different ways, and I think this is a good reflection for how most people in general view those with disabilities. There are those who view them with compassion, and there are those who want to “fix” them to be “normal” humans. I think the film shows this contrast well and attempts to ask the viewers which side they fall on, and whether or not it is completely right or completely wrong to be on one side because, in the end, Elizabeth’s compassion leads to her death. It was also Victor’s lack of compassion that leads to his death, so we’re still left with the central question of how to treat people with disabilities in our minds.

– Mark Acuña

By going in-depth with the interpretation of what we are trying to convey our attention from the indifferences between Victor and the monster is how in question number 4, it states that “Somehow, by wanting to produce a more perfect human being, Victor and Elizabeth are admitting to disabilities of their own. A creature impervious to pain and is virtually indestructible by medical and other violent means would be a triumph to the Frankensteins- if Adam were more conventionally attractive and had a nuero-typical consciousness”. This is thought of throughout the main storyline as we look on how their own insecurities play a part in the effects that follow afterwards in the novel. Their own persona leads them into believing that they themselves are not pure and do not posses the same level of human hood as the monster carries. As their ultimate plan to succeed in life is put into a halt until their death, since the monster was able to complete his own future – as the perfect human.

Tania De Lira-Miranda

The comments that offers a broader interpretation of the film would be #2; Victor and Elizabeth view their creation in different ways. In a way they serve as stand-ins for how science tends to view people with disabilities. On the one hand, Elizabeth, people with disabilities are still able to feel and should be viewed with compassion. They should be cared for. On the other hand, Victor, represents viewing people with disabilities as lesser, as failed by-products, that need to be taken care of.

The reason why is because it really reflects the real world. People react to people with disability in one of two ways; they either feel like the world needs to do more to help people or that they feel like people with disabilities are a nuisance. By explaining how Elizabeth and Victor react to Adam, we could discuss which view is the ‘correct one’ and which one the world should have:l. This would then lead to a talk where we discuss  the real world applications of the views. So either what people have done to help make life easier for people with disabilities or how the world is ableist

Arlyne Gonzalez

In response to #5, the student mentioned how Adam was treated and approached as to how a dog will be attended in a vet. This particular analogy captured my interest, because when Adam is being injected with a needle, it reminded me of when I took my dog to the vet. Given that Adam was not born like a normal human being, the scientists do not consider him to be an individual, but rather a “successful” experiment conduced by Victor Frankenstein. Therefore, they believed Adam’s life did not have any meaning nor value. Victor did not want to endure nor take responsibility for Adam’s violent fit toward the other scientists, and instead did not care as much as to search for him and prevent Adam from triggering another violent episode toward innocents, like Wanda and Eddie. This demonstrates how Victor Frankenstein did not encompass the intellect and the common sense that comes with experimenting and challenging nature by brining another creature into the human society. A place that is not all rainbows and happiness, much more a cruel and lonely place for those who encompass grotesque appearances and not two dimes to rub together. That is called the world. Unfortunately, that is where Adam was thrown into and had not one clue how to endure his hardships.

The Top Hat that has the most potential for the use as a broader interpretation of the film would be the second one. This post has the potential to do this since it gives a stance on how every major character interacts with Adam and his (dis)bility. The fact that one would be able to do this gives the post the potential insight on all the ways society views (dis)abled people. Another reason the second post would be ideal to interpret the entire film would be that it touches on a very hot debate of nature vs nurture.

Alexander Alfaro