Tag Archive: adam


Kindness and Caution: Attitudes Towards Adam

Selection 2 has the broadest observation over the film since, in almost every scene that is essential, there is always that underlying notion about what compassion and inhumanity should be enacted upon Adam. As we see with the scenes with Eddie, he is compassionate to “Monster” as he knows that he is unable to speak and has trouble understanding the world; a trait of community and understanding that ultimately leads to a development for Adam. However, the inhumanities Adam had suffered from his very creator Victor (and Elizabeth) through the process of Euthanasia can be seen in smaller sequences throughout the film; mostly upon other interactions with people since they see Adam as just a grotesque abomination. A good fit for one who is both kind and cautious of Adam would have been Wanda, where she is shocked by his appearance but nevertheless respects him and tries to educate him (in more ways than one(until her exit(yeesh))).

Alejandro Joseph Serrano

Now and Then

6. The way they restrained Adam could be a call back to how patients in psychiatric “hospitals” were cared for.

 

In the past, Like mentioned in question 6 , I believe that mental psychiatric hospitals treated patients very differently than how they do now. I believe that this topic can be very broad because there is so much to talk about. In the film, it is very evident that, Adam or the monster was treated very terribly. Some may think that it was just part of the film, but in reality , it was how everything was back then. For example, for the most part there weren’t a lot of rules from stoping these Psychiatric workers from treating patients in ways that they did. As we know, Ethical measures didn’t start coming into play, late into Psychological and Psychiatrical development, which meant these workers really didn’t care how they treated patients. This film perfectly represents how patients time ago were mistreated, by doing what they did to the monster.

Rigoberto Garcia

Tania De Lira-Miranda

The comments that offers a broader interpretation of the film would be #2; Victor and Elizabeth view their creation in different ways. In a way they serve as stand-ins for how science tends to view people with disabilities. On the one hand, Elizabeth, people with disabilities are still able to feel and should be viewed with compassion. They should be cared for. On the other hand, Victor, represents viewing people with disabilities as lesser, as failed by-products, that need to be taken care of.

The reason why is because it really reflects the real world. People react to people with disability in one of two ways; they either feel like the world needs to do more to help people or that they feel like people with disabilities are a nuisance. By explaining how Elizabeth and Victor react to Adam, we could discuss which view is the ‘correct one’ and which one the world should have:l. This would then lead to a talk where we discuss  the real world applications of the views. So either what people have done to help make life easier for people with disabilities or how the world is ableist

Adam, the Sick Puppy

Esther Quintanilla

I noticed that the “disability” portrayed in the film is “Adam’s” inability to speak and comprehend his surroundings. This is something that the doctors believed needed to be fixed. In doing so, they treated “Adam” like an animal; the scene in which they inject medicine into his body is very similar to when a veterinarian puts shots into a dog.

I believe this observation has the most potential to offer a broader interpretation of the film Frankenstein. The comparison of Adam to a sick animal can be considered one of the most problematic ideas that could come into play in an essay, but it would be the most interesting because there are many similarities to take into account. Sick animals are a sight to be cooed at, pet owners will go to extreme lengths to take care of and protect their animals. When the pets are sick, the owners will take them to the veterinarian and get them “fixed” as soon as humanly possible. This is a problem because the pets are no longer animals, but commodities that need to be taken care of. The problem with the view of disabled people as sick animals takes away their humanity, almost creating a person who has no business being a person unless they can be “fixed” into a perfect being. In “fixing” their disabilities, they are then accepted as equals. This idea could branch off to discuss what it means to be human, the particular qualities that make the “perfect” human, and what people need to do/need to be born into in order to be accepted in their societies.